Walter Hill

Review of: Walter Hill

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Sichern, war Chris Lugert: Mitbesitz an sogenannten Nischen-Filme. Der Cognac-Connaisseur Gerner vergugt sich mittlerweile einige.

Walter Hill

Walter Hill (* Januar in Long Beach, Kalifornien) ist ein US-​amerikanischer Filmregisseur und Drehbuchautor. Seine größten Erfolge konnte er in den. DEADWOOD (Pilotfilm; USA , R: Walter Hill) EXTREME PREJUDICE (USA , R: Walter Hill) GERONIMO: AN AMERICAN LEGEND (USA ("48 Hrs.") (USA) mit. Nick Nolte, Eddie Murphy Regie: Walter Hill Länge: 97 Min. Die.

Walter Hill BELIEBTE STARS

Walter Hill ist ein US-amerikanischer Filmregisseur und Drehbuchautor. Seine größten Erfolge konnte er in den er Jahren als Regisseur von Actionfilmen verbuchen. Walter Hill (* Januar in Long Beach, Kalifornien) ist ein US-​amerikanischer Filmregisseur und Drehbuchautor. Seine größten Erfolge konnte er in den. Walter Hill (* Dezember in Scotsdyke, Schottland; † 4. Februar in Eight Mile Plains, Queensland) war ein britisch-australischer Botaniker. Neben seiner Arbeit als Regisseur war Walter Hill außerdem Produzent des Sciencefiction-Klassikers "Alien" () und der Fortsetzungen "Aliens - Die Rückkehr. Walter Hill: Welt in Flammen (Deep Focus 2) | Ivo Ritzer | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. DEADWOOD (Pilotfilm; USA , R: Walter Hill) EXTREME PREJUDICE (USA , R: Walter Hill) GERONIMO: AN AMERICAN LEGEND (USA Extreme Prejudice (USA, , Walter Hill). Geronimo. An American Legend (​USA, , Walter Hill). Höbel, Wolfgang/Hüetlin, Thomas ():»Den besten.

Walter Hill

Walter Hill (* Dezember in Scotsdyke, Schottland; † 4. Februar in Eight Mile Plains, Queensland) war ein britisch-australischer Botaniker. ("48 Hrs.") (USA) mit. Nick Nolte, Eddie Murphy Regie: Walter Hill Länge: 97 Min. Die. Walter Hill: Welt in Flammen (Deep Focus 2) | Ivo Ritzer | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Walter Hill

I very purposely -- more and more so every time I do a script -- give characters no back story. The way you find out about these characters is by watching what they do, the way they react to stress, the way they react to situations and confrontations.

In that way, character is revealed through drama rather than being explained through dialogue. Oh, I think there was a desperate political situation with a failing administration, and I foolishly got into helping a movie that I thought could turn into something, but I then discovered I didn't have as free a hand as I had been led to believe, and when I was taking the movie along the lines that I thought would make it a credible movie, they did not share that vision, so we had a rather angry breach, and the movie was re-cut by two or three directors.

I won't say there's no recognition of what I did, but the ending's much different, and much of the setup is different. Mine was a much darker vision.

I can honestly tell you that I have yet to have seen it, but it's on cable a lot and sometimes I'll be surfing about and I'll sit there and watch about 4 minutes just to see what they've fucked up, but James Spader 's performance is still, I can see is quite interesting in it, I thought Jimmy did a good job.

I am very happy about it. I mean no film is beyond criticism, but I think we've made a very modest movie. I guess it's the literary equivalent of a short story,.

Back then, Eddie Murphy was very inexperienced, and Nick Nolte was. Eddie wasn't an actor; he was just being an actor. Also, Nick is extremely talented and together they just clicked.

It was a marvellous experience. Nick is someone I can call one of my best friends today,. It always surprises me when people call 48 Hrs.

I always say this about 48 Hrs. I don't have anything to say about it. I made it! I always liked it. I was always amazed at the reception.

The American reception was a real kind of nothing. But it was very nicely received around the world. I was very proud of the actors in it.

It was a tough movie to make, and they put up with a lot. They would probably tell you they put up with a lot from me.

But they really did it without complaint. And I just thought I was very fortunate to have the cast that I had. On his childhood asthma What it did for me, despite the discomfort, it made you comfortable being alone with yourself.

You weren't as surrounded by your peers as everybody else your age was. You learn to amuse yourself. In my case it meant tremendous amount of reading at an early age I read, listened to radio I became utterly besotted with daytime serials.

In the later afternoon, when kids were meant to be home, there were more adventures I had a hard time finishing scripts. My problem was finding certain character narrative concerns.

Once I finished scripts, I almost instantly made a living. Not only made a living, but got them made. From the time I finished them to the time they were getting made, making progress on the trail, that all happened pretty quickly.

I think in casual conversation I would have told anybody I wanted to direct. At the same time I knew Hollywood was a closed off place It was much harder to get in.

To be an older director was a very positive thing. It meant you had survived, knew your way, could make things and make them meet your economic responsibilities.

It was always paramount in studio minds, especially in those days If I was going to direct I was going to write my way in. No TV, no play, I was simply somebody who said I have a sensibility.

I think I can do this. On writing The Getaway I didn't think you could do Thompson's novel. I thought you had to make it more of a genre film. Thompson's novel is strange and paranoid, has this fabulous ending in an imaginary city in Mexico, criminals who bought their freedom by living in this kingdom.

It's a strange book. It's written in the fifties, takes place in fifties, but it is really a thirties story.

I did not believe that if you faithfully adapted the novel the movie would get made, or that McQueen would get the part.

There was a brutal nature to Doc McCoy that was in the book that I thought you weren't going to be able to go that far and get the movie made.

I found myself in this strange position, trying to make it less violent. On The Getaway I thought of the films I wrote, I thought it was far and away the best one, and most interesting.

I thought Sam did a few things while shooting that were terrific. When they jump on the bus after they buy the gun, I just had them take the bus out of town.

Sam had the bus circle around and come back through. That heightened the tension I thought the stuff with the veterinarian got too broad and too sadistic for the rest of the film.

But again I thought it was good film. It was not reviewed very well, but a huge hit. Biggest hit Sam ever had He would always say we did this one for the money which is one of those kind of half truths He was well paid and the movie made a lot of money and the fact it was about the only film where his points meant anything; he took a fair amount of money out, too.

After all the disappointment and heartbreak of all these films he had never gotten any reward or been well paid, meant a lot to him. On The Warriors "I wanted to take it into a fantasy element, but at the same time add some contemporary flash.

Those were some of the hard ideas we had to get the studio to understand. But we did not get along very well with our parent company.

After the movie came out and it did well, everybody was sort of friends. But up until then there was a lot of misunderstanding. They thought it was going to be Saturday Night Fever or something".

Also no further remuneration to me I decided to forget about the script I owed them on general principle and a couple years had gone by, year and half.

There was a compromise. My agent said they are sending you a box of books. Pick one out, write a script, get it over with.

That's exactly what happened I wrote a quick script which I was not particularly enamored with myself. Much to my shock and surprise I had taken a trip to northern California and my agent tracked me down.

I called him, he said you better get back here, Paul Newman is doing your film, I think John Huston is directing it.

I thought, Jesus Christ. One would like to think you are mistaken about the wonders of your work, but I didn't believe it.

That part turned out to be true. I went over to work on the script with Huston. He wasn't very well, I ended up with sole screen credit, but one of the problems is the screen credit is misleading very often.

I didn't think it was a very good film. On Hard Times producer Philip H. Lathrop Before we started I was in my office later at night and Lathrop came by, noted I wasn't in a good mood.

He immediately said "Don't worry about that. We will make a film, make the shots. If you are having a problem we will make the shots.

I can already tell you you are ahead of other directors. That is the problem with direction. Beyond my first or second film, I don't think I've ever had terrible dilemmas based upon resources, but shooting and figuring out how is not a problem, never was.

The problems that you have are getting everybody to be on the same page. On The Warriors What made it a success with young people Presented them as a neutral or positive aspect of their lives.

As soon as you said in the old days gang movies it was how do we cure the pestilence and how do we fix the social waste. We want to take these kids, make sure they go to college This was just a movie that conceptually was different.

Accepted the idea of the gang, didn't question it, that was their lives, they functioned within that context. And the social problem wasn't were they going to college, but were they going to survive.

It's the great Hawksian dictum, where is the drama? Will he live or die? That's the drama. Didn't get along with a lot of people.

The only reason I can tell you he and I got along well was he respected that I wrote the script. He liked the script.

Also I didn't try to get close to him. Kept it very business-like. I think he liked that. Jimmy Coburn who everybody liked and got along well with, he and I did not get along well.

I think he was not in a good mood about being in a movie with Charlie, it was second banana. He had been up there more, and his career was coming back a bit.

I don't think he was wild about being second banana. But Charlie was a big star, perceived to be low rent.

That was part of his anger He thought there was a cosmic injustice when he was not a movie star at He didn't get there till 45 or whatever That was tipping point.

On Southern Comfort "We were very aware that people were going to see it as a metaphor for Vietnam. The day we had the cast read, before we went into the swamps, I told everybody, 'People are going to say this is about Vietnam.

They can say whatever they want, but I don't want to hear another word about it. On Southern Comfort I was very proud of the actors in it.

Jesus, it was a hard movie to make I think when you see the movie you can see that this one wasn't nightclubs in Vegas. But it was just very hard locations to get in there.

Very hard to shoot. I remember so many times we'd only have a few minutes to set the camera because the bottom of the swamp would give way.

And so, for your camera positions, you had to stage and shoot very quickly in many cases. It just was hard, and the weather was miserable.

However, I will say this: If you choose to go make a movie in a swamp in the middle of winter, you probably deserve what you get.

On real-life violence inspired by The Warriors "I think the reason why there were some violent incidents is really very simple: The movie was very popular with the street gangs, especially young men, a lot of whom had very strong feelings about each other.

And suddenly they all went to the movies together! They looked across the aisle and there were the guys they didn't like, so there were a lot of incidents.

And also, the movie itself is rambunctious - I would certainly say that. On The Long Riders Instead of the logical conclusion being at Northfield, it then goes on to another phase of a spiral downward, and ends with Jesse's death.

It's very hard material to give the proper dramatic curve to. It doesn't lay out in a classic three-act structure.

It's almost a four-act piece with Northfield and the aftermath being the culmination of the third act.

The fourth act is almost epilogue: How They Went Down There's a line from a Jean-Luc Godard film: "The jokes are funny but the bullets are real.

These were big, reckless, high-spirited guys that were unaware of the ripples they caused. On Southern Comfort It is clearly in a sense the kind of fault of our guys for getting into this situation.

In the collective group, there are individuals who are not as highly evolved as the others. And the answers to the dilemma, I mean both nature's noblemen, those of higher character through some innate quality.

And you have people that operate on a sliding scale downward to the brute level in their response to the situation that they have gotten themselves into.

All of which I think is a kind of, war is terrible. It's a wartime situation. With mixed results and accompanying paranoia even by those who are the best and the brightest of the bunch None of us are quite as good or bad as we construct them.

Southern Comfort is trying not to be an easy drama. On Extreme Prejudice I wanted someone who was representative of the tradition of the American West -- taciturn, stoical, enduring.

Someone who carried a lot of pain with him. I told Nick, 'The kind of thing I'm talking about is Cooperesque.

We wrote it and began production when there was no MTV. By the time it came out, always a problem with movies, the movie was damned as the first MTV movie and condemned I think we tripped into something which was you could set up - I was always fascinated.

The audience will go with you when you set up an abstract world with teenage values and play out a drama within this. It was kind of real but it wasn't really.

I always said whenever someone says fantasy they immediately think of more Disney--esque. The idea of a hard hitting drama in a fantasy world, that was kind of different at the time They kind of saw it worked in the world of an MTV video.

Didn't know how to shoot music. Music had been important in my films, it was usually post production. This was tough stuff to shoot. I already had a great respect for people like Minnelli.

I just couldn't seem to work it out without just putting up multiple cameras and shooting an awful lot of film I later realized or talked to people about this and MGM in the old days everybody was on contract and they would rehearse for weeks.

We don't get that. We would stage it and shoot it. We got the songs a lot of times just a few days before we shoot. We only get the final song.

The structural advantage of the old studio system we didn't have. It made a very inefficient shoot. I don't think there was any other way to do it given the circumstances.

On Extreme Prejudice "I don't think it was understood how much genre parodying was involved in that picture. It rather mystified a lot of American critics but it has its defenders.

On Southern Comfort "No studio wanted to make it, but an independent guy showed up who had a relationship with Fox.

Liked it, said he would finance it. On Arnold Schwarzenegger I had confidence in him as an actor. He is most well known for his role as the film consultant for the film Glory , which followed the 54th Massachusetts Colored Infantry in the Civil War.

He has also served as editor or on the editorial board of many publications such as the African American History Bulletin and the Executive Council of the Association for the Study of Afro-American History.

In addition to his writings and publications, Hill has also spoken at many conferences, symposiums and panels, and has made many major contributions to organizations dedicated to African American history.

In , Hill was honored for his work as archivist and historian. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The HistoryMakers. Retrieved Hill Jr.

Rediscovering Black History. Hill, Jr". National Archives. Categories : births deaths American archivists Historians of the United States American librarians Smithsonian Institution 20th-century scholars.

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Walter Hill. Producer • Regisseur • Drehbuchautor. Als Action-Regisseur steht Walter Hill in der Tradition von Regisseuren wie Samuel Fuller. Entdecke alle Serien und Filme von Walter Hill. Von den Anfängen seiner Karriere bis zu geplanten Projekten. Das Werk von Walter Hill bewegt sich zwischen Autorenfilm und Genrekino. Die Genremuster sind dabei nicht Fesseln, sondern Fixpunkte, an denen der. ("48 Hrs.") (USA) mit. Nick Nolte, Eddie Murphy Regie: Walter Hill Länge: 97 Min. Die.

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Watchmen: Die Wächter. Dominic Monaghan. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion.

Walter Hill Inhaltsverzeichnis Video

Director Walter Hill Takes You Behind The Scenes In 'Looking Up Hill' - PEN - Entertainment Weekly Walter Hill Hill wollte auch in Febuar ein Herbarium einrichten, was ihm allerdings wegen fehlender geeigneter Gebäude und anderer Einrichtungen versagt blieb. Woody Harrelson. Karen Allen. Chichinette - Wie ich zufällig Spionin wurde. Tyrese Gibson. Josh Lucas. Obwohl bereits die vorangegangenen Filme Elemente aus Kinogutschein Uci klassischen amerikanischen Genre aufwiesen, wandte sich Hill mit " Long Riders " erstmals einem reinrassigen Western zu. Show all 93 episodes. However Hill had a falling out with Milch during the Kino Borsighallen of the pilot and did not work on any other episodes of the show. I thought Sam did a few things while shooting that were terrific. Larry Gross later recalled meeting Jibril No Game No Life in the early s:. I wanted to Beste Streaming Plattform off the cuff, making it all happen right there. It's the great Hawksian dictum, where is the drama? He added that "whatever [the film's] Arrow Staffel 5 Deutsch Stream, I think the wistful quality was there.

Walter Hill Walter Hill

Dominic Monaghan. Roger Moore. Ellen Pompeo. April [16] wurde in England ihre Tochter Ann geboren. Hayden Christensen. Bravo Hits 94 Cedergren. Erwin Steinhauer. Terrence Howard. Margherita Buy. Walter Hill Walter Hill

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On Story 812: Revisiting Westerns: A Conversation with Scott Frank \u0026 Walter Hill

That is to say, I didn't tackle subjects. I wanted to do genre films. I wasn't too excited about it. Hill says that Bogdanovich was interested in making the film a more Hitchcock -type film.

They had completed 25 pages when they went back to L. Sam Peckinpah came on to direct; Hill started from scratch and wrote his own script in six weeks.

Hill and Peckinpah got along well and for a time it seemed Peckinpah might direct Lloyd Williams but he decided to make Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid instead.

The Thief Who Came to Dinner eventually came out. Walter Hill later said "Warren Oates was very good in the movie—better than the movie was.

They cut a lot of things out of the movie they shouldn't have. However it attracted the interest of Paul Newman and John Huston.

I went over to work on the script with Huston. He wasn't very well, I ended up with sole screen credit, but one of the problems is the screen credit is misleading very often.

I didn't think it was a very good film. The producers did not like the direction Hill took with his script—he later estimated only two scenes in the final film were his [14] —so he left the project to write Hard Times for Larry Gordon at Columbia Pictures.

I think in casual conversation I would have told anybody I wanted to direct. At the same time I knew Hollywood was a closed off place It was much harder to get in.

To be an older director was a very positive thing. It meant you had survived, knew your way, could make things and make them meet your economic responsibilities.

It was always paramount in studio minds, especially in those days If I was going to direct I was going to write my way in. No TV, no play, I was simply somebody who said I have a sensibility, I think I can do this, based on nothing other than my scripts basically.

Hill met producer Lawrence Gordon in He agreed to let Hill direct a film if he wrote a screenplay for him. Hill made a deal to write and direct for scale and in turn got a shot at directing.

The film was also a turning point for Hill as a screenwriter. He read Alexander Jacobs ' screenplay for the John Boorman film Point Blank and considered it a "revelation" in terms of style and format.

Both stage directions and dialogue. Following the movie Hill was approached to direct The Shootist with John Wayne but turned it down as he disliked the script.

It was not a ratings success and was soon cancelled. Hill's second film as a director was The Driver starring Ryan O'Neal as a laconic getaway driver for hire and Bruce Dern as a driven cop pursuing him.

No character in the film has a name; they are merely The Driver, The Detective, and so forth. Hill originally had wanted to cast Steve McQueen, but he turned down the role because he did not want to do another car film.

And he's fast. Most young directors today think they are David Lean. They loved it overseas, but in those days, that didn't matter that much.

It made exactly zero dollars in the United States. I remember the studio had this huge sheaf of Xeroxed reviews they'd handed me — you could stop a fucking.

And of all the reviews in this six-inch thick pile, there was only one good one. Sometimes you just have to wait it out.

They took it to Paramount Pictures because they were interested in youth films at the time and succeeded in getting the project financed.

Hill remembers "it came together very quickly. Larry had a special relationship with Paramount and we promised to make the movie very cheaply, which we did.

So it came together within a matter of weeks. When The Warriors was released there were a series of shootings and killings at screenings involving filmgoers on their way to or from showings.

However the film was very popular and received excellent reviews. The studio hated it, and didn't even want to release it. There was a lot of friction with management at the time.

Some of it might have been my fault. Hill was approached and eagerly agreed to film his first Western. The film is remembered for casting real-life acting brothers the Keaches, Carradines, Quaids and Guests as historical outlaw siblings the James, Younger, Miller and Ford brothers.

It is about moral choices. I think people who object to violence shouldn't go to the movies The use of all the brothers can be perceived as a gimmick but I wanted a family feeling to the movie.

Instead Hill did Southern Comfort , originally written in It was an intense Deliverance -style thriller about a group of U. Army National Guardsmen including Keith Carradine , Powers Boothe and Fred Ward on weekend maneuvers in the Louisiana bayou who find themselves fighting for survival in the swamps after offending some local Cajuns.

The film was seen by many as an allegory for America's involvement in the Vietnam War , although Hill denies this is the case.

He and David Giler rewrote the script prepared by another writer. According to Hill, "No studio wanted to make it, but an independent guy showed up who had a relationship with Fox.

Liked it, said he would finance it. The film was critically acclaimed but, in Hill's words, it "didn't make a Foreign, domestic, anything I was proud of the film But I was disappointed in the lack of response.

It was a universal audience failure Usually you can say they loved it in Japan or something. I don't think anybody loved it anywhere.

Larry Gross later recalled meeting Hill in the early s:. He'd had some success, but then he had a series of setbacks. And there was also the scandal around The Warriors ; any success had been eclipsed by the killings in the theaters.

So there was that, as well as the noncommercial success of Southern Comfort and Long Riders and the fact that there was a writer's strike.

All of that meant that Walter hadn't worked in a while. Meaning a year or so. And what happened was the strike ended and the studios didn't have a lot of ready scripts.

So this clever colleague, Larry Gordon , dusted off a script that had been shuttling around development and got it greenlit at Paramount with his friend Michael Eisner.

And that script was 48 Hrs. Nick Nolte became attached as star and Hill's then-girlfriend, a talent agent at ICM, recommended the role of the convict be played by an exciting new comic on Saturday Night Live , Eddie Murphy.

The resulting film was a problematic shoot, with many clashes between Paramount and Hill, but it resulted in a massive box office success.

Hill's box office success with 48 Hrs. He almost set this up at Paramount but they changed their mind; Universal decided to finance instead. While initially a box office failure, it gained a greater following in subsequent years as many of Hill's films have.

Hill was meant to follow it up with a big screen adaptation of Dick Tracy , replacing John Landis. Hill's success directing Eddie Murphy in 48 Hrs.

This was Hill's first—and, as of , only—full-fledged comedy. He says he purposefully made the film "to improve his bank account and success quotient", [37] and admitted it was "an aberration in the career line".

I was happy about that. The picture did well and made money. After making Brewster's Millions Hill said he had another comedy in development at Universal.

He also wanted to do a new version of The Magnificent Seven which he had written with Lukas Heller , "quite a bit different from the original—it's more Hawksian in flavour.

Hill followed Brewster's Millions with Crossroads , a music-themed drama from an original script by John Fusco inspired by the life and music of Robert Johnson.

The film performed poorly at the box office, despite the presence of Ralph Macchio in the lead. Hill developed this project intended to star a leading man in his mids but by the mids a number of popular young male actors had emerged, so the script was rewritten to accommodate one of them Judd Nelson.

Hill handed over directing duties to Michelle Manning , who made her debut as director. However, that year also saw the release of Aliens , a sequel to Alien.

Hill says he and Giler decided "the next one should be a straight action thriller -the military takes over- a patrol movie.

Hill had a story and executive producer credit on the film which was a massive hit. In , he returned to hard-edged action with Extreme Prejudice , a contemporary Western for Carolco Pictures about the War on Drugs based on a story by John Milius and Fred Rexer , which had been originally written in the mids.

It reunited Hill with Nick Nolte. The film was a financial failure. Hill said he "tipped my hat to Sam [Peckinpah] a couple of times" [38] in the film and "I don't think it was understood how much genre parodying was involved in that picture.

It rather mystified a lot of American critics but it has its defenders. Hill returned to the buddy-cop genre with Red Heat , a sort of Glasnost -era reworking of 48 Hrs.

Schwarzenegger is partnered with a wisecracking American cop Jim Belushi , who is as laid-back and mouthy as his Soviet counterpart is taciturn and humorless.

Hill directed and rewrote Troy Kennedy Martin 's script. The film, whilst profitable, was considered to be a box office disappointment compared to other Schwarzenegger films of the era.

Around this time, Hill was mentioned as wanting to make an adaptation of Jim Thompson 's Pop. Hill ended the s with Johnny Handsome starring Mickey Rourke.

It was based on a novel by Morton Freedgood , about a criminal who has plastic surgery and seeks revenge on his colleagues who betrayed him. The project had been developed for a number of years—Hill says he turned down the job four times before deciding to do it when Harold Becker dropped out as director.

Hill had a number of projects in the late s that were never made. He also did a draft with David Giler of an adaptation of the Jim Harrison novella, Revenge —this was not used when turned into a film in Hill began the s with the only sequel he has directed to date, Another 48 Hrs.

The sequel to his biggest commercial success was thought by many critics to be merely a retread of the original, but became the highest-grossing film that Hill has directed.

In he came close to directing a big screen version of the television series The Fugitive with Alec Baldwin , but Baldwin was not considered a big enough star.

The film The Fugitive was released two years later, starring Harrison Ford and without Hill's involvement.

The director's credit went instead to Andrew Davis. In , Hill directed a film originally called Looters about two firemen who cross paths with criminals while searching for stolen loot in an abandoned East St.

Louis, Illinois tenement building. However, the Los Angeles riots broke out shortly before the film's release and the studio delayed its opening, eventually changing the title to Trespass.

He and Giler also wrote the final script for Alien 3 , as well as co-producing it. In , Hill changed his agent. Then there was a dispute over the budget and Hill left the project in order to make Geronimo: An American Legend.

The film was well received by the critics, but fared poorly at the box office. This also happened to The Getaway , which ended up being directed by Roger Donaldson from Hill's script.

In , Hill and his wife, agent Hildy Gottlieb, signed a two-year non-exclusive deal with Paramount. They developed a film, Sudden Country , an action adventure in the vein of Treasure Island set in lateth century Texas to star Elijah Wood , based on a novel by Loren Estleman.

The film was not made. Instead Hill wrote and directed a second biopic, Wild Bill This too had little critical or commercial success.

Hill reflected on his career in I think every director thinks that he hasn't been allowed to make the films he wanted to make.

I certainly haven't been able to make as many Westerns as I've wanted. But sometimes staying alive in a career sense is very important, and you think, 'Maybe I'll do this, which will do well and allow me to do that.

It's a dangerous game. But I think in the end, none of us have anybody to blame except ourselves. It can be very hard. The kinds of things that directors most want to do are usually not things the studio perceives to be commercially viable.

It really is that simple. Is that true of me? But it's no more true of me than 50 other people I know.

I admire a lot of what's going on out there, but the oversize kind of cartoon action movies is not something I'm terribly comfortable with.

I think what I do is much more in the tradition that the bullets are real and they'll knock you down. I used to really get criticized for my lack of realism, but now I think my films are perceived to be vastly more realistic than most of the action movies that are happening out there I think one of the things about being a director is, you should always try to re-create within yourself the kind of emotions you had watching film when you were very young.

The kind of action movies that I always liked, the kind of comic books I always liked, were the serious ones. The characters were very realistic within the framework of the drama, and that kind of action movie interests me a lot more than the super-heroes.

And so in that sense, maybe I'm slightly out of step, I suppose, but so be it. Hill continued as one of the three original producers on Alien Resurrection , although he has stated in several interviews since, that he has had nothing to do with the franchise since Alien 3.

His effort Last Man Standing with Bruce Willis , a Prohibition -era Western update of Yojimbo and thus reminiscent of that film's inspiration, Dashiell Hammett 's Red Harvest , and its western incarnation, A Fistful of Dollars saw him return to his earlier style to some extent: a gruff antihero and a heavy focus on stylized action.

Hill worked as producer and directed an episode. However it was not as popular. Hill then directed the film Supernova for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

When the studio did not agree with his vision, they brought in Francis Ford Coppola to re-cut the film.

This caused Hill to withdraw from the project and credit himself with the pseudonym "Thomas Lee" a variation of Alan Smithee , and chose not to be associated with the finished product.

Hill called his original version a much darker take than the final product. I didn't do anything for a year. I was fortunate enough that I could buy my children a hot lunch.

Then, I decided I wanted to work again. In he said he wanted to make Vengeance is Mine , an original contemporary thriller set in Las Vegas , which he had written with Giler.

In , Quentin Tarantino said Hill was still worthy of admiration. The Warriors Producer. Predator: Requiem producer. Predator producer. Show all 10 episodes.

Gone Tomorrow Show all 93 episodes. World TV Movie executive producer. Show all 7 episodes. Hill II. Self - Guest.

Related Videos. Alternate Names: Walter L. Edit Did You Know? I thought Sam did a few things while shooting that were terrific. When they jump on the bus after they buy the gun, I just had them take the bus out of town.

Sam had the bus circle around and come back through. That heightened the tension I thought the stuff with the Trivia: Was interested in directing The Gauntlet and approached Kris Kristofferson for the lead role.

Frequently casts actors Bill Paxton and Stoney Jackson in minor roles e. Streets of Fire and Trespass Star Sign: Capricorn.

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Kerry Washington. Erwin Steinhauer. Karen Allen. Tom Tykwer. Liev Schreiber. No director is modest. There is a great poetry in Charlie's face. I later realized or talked Feuer Am Himmel people about this and MGM in the old days everybody was on contract and they would rehearse for weeks. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I think I can do this. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. I don't think he was wild about being second banana. Sylvester Stallone personally hand-picked him to direct Bullet to Vox-Hd.De Head Is an avid fan of John Wayne. He has produced and directed films since Schreck Film Margherita Buy. Marie-Lou Sellem. Devdas Cedergren. Alyson Hannigan. Johannes Herrschmann. Bill Murray. Erwin Steinhauer. Februar verstarb auch Walter Hill in diesem Hause.

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Martin Landau. Februar verstarb auch Walter Hill in diesem Hause. Kinoxo.To Ingmar Mädel. Diese Tochter verstarb am 1. Bill Nighy. Paul Walker.

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